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Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Go beyond the film with a novelization featuring new scenes and expanded material. As the shadows of the Empire loom ever larger across the galaxy, so do deeply troubling rumors. The Rebellion has learned of a sinister Imperial plot to bring entire worlds to their knees. Deep in Empire-dominated space, a machine of unimaginable destructive power is nearing completion. A w…

Title : Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
Author : Alexander Freed
Rating :
ISBN : 0399178457
Edition Language : English
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 319 pages

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story Reviews

  • Amy Sturgis
    Dec 21, 2016

    If you enjoyed

    and want a richer understanding of its plot and characters, 1) read

    by James Luceno, and then 2) read

    by Alexander Freed.

    This novelization rates about a 3.5 for me.

    Here are a few of my favorite descriptions and lines that show what Freed’s novelization adds to the reader’s understanding of the story.

    SPOILERS!

    From Chapter 10:

    If you enjoyed

    and want a richer understanding of its plot and characters, 1) read

    by James Luceno, and then 2) read

    by Alexander Freed.

    This novelization rates about a 3.5 for me.

    Here are a few of my favorite descriptions and lines that show what Freed’s novelization adds to the reader’s understanding of the story.

    SPOILERS!

    From Chapter 10:

    From Chapter 12:

    From Chapter 20:

    From Chapter 22:

  • Julie
    Dec 23, 2016

    I was hard-pressed to choose a flagship

    I was hard-pressed to choose a flagship quote for my review, because I highlighted literally 97 of them(!), but I went for this one because it illustrates some of the Rogue One team dynamic

    a subtle detail that I missed while watching.

    First off, don’t read this novelisation until you’ve seen the film! But listen to me: I

    the movie, and this actually improves upon its source material. It clarifies some character motivations & intentions, fleshes them out a bit more, makes you care about them even more. Freed infuses each of the characters with more personality: Jyn’s driving need to find something to believe in, her complicated abandonment issues about both her fathers; Saw Gerrera’s own noble, half-mad convictions; Cassian’s guilt complexes; Baze’s bitter fury; Chirrut’s wry humour; even Bodhi’s gambling problems. Alan Dean Foster’s The Force Awakens’ novelisation was garbage, but Freed’s prose is lovely; Cassian’s opening scene is almost noir-like in his interrogation of an informant on a dark and seedy station.

    Freed also has a great grasp on character voice, which seeps into the narration. You can hear in Galen Erso’s thoughts that the man is robotic and analytical; K-2SO is clipped and cynical as he calculates his way to conclusions; Orson Krennic has a slimy, unctuous arrogance to his narration. There are some POV chapters from aliens, too, which remind you that even their thought processes differ from humans on a species level.

    The sheer desperation and diversity of the Rebel Alliance is on full display, all of their leaders struggling with finding the right approach to an unstoppable war machine. I loved seeing more from characters like Mon Mothma and General Draven.

    And in seeing the narrative focus on the Empire’s race to develop the Death Star, as well, I was reminded of WWII’s nuclear arms-race, like a chilling commentary on our own use of inconceivable might and atrocity. In the words of Galen Erso himself: “My colleagues, many of them, have fooled themselves into thinking they are creating something so terrible and powerful it will never be used. But they’re wrong. No weapon has ever been left on the shelf.”

    When the Death Star

    unleashed for the first time… it has so much more emotional effect than it did in the film. In the movie, it’s a fantastic visual, a thrilling chase scene to escape. Whereas in the novelisation, I found myself getting teary on the subway for throwaway bystanders; it drove in the impact so that you

    it, you see the lives snuffed out. It’s a series of horrors, but the one that actually got me worst was the Imperial stormtroopers left behind by their own callous empire, because fuuuuck:

    And like the

    novelisation, chapters here are abridged with epistolary interludes that do a tremendous job of worldbuilding the Alliance and Empire: communiques back and forth, reports on planets and people, showing the inner workings of these organisations. Possibly my very favourite section of the

    were the slew of memos back and forth between Galen, Krennic, and an exasperated Death Star QA technician. You actually get to see how Galen masterfully exploits reverse psychology, tight project deadlines and therefore cutting corners, and pressure from Imperial higher-ups to lay his trap & sabotage the project, all while sounding like he’s arguing for the exact opposite, and

    It’s fantastic.

    The ending is a series of successive punches to the heart, and I finished the book crying in bed. I’m happily going to read everything else Freed has written now tbh (I’m excited for

    especially, because WAR FEELS).

    The best novelisations contribute to their films rather than just being a shallow money-grab tie-in, and I’m happy to say that this is a stellar example of the former. I liked the PacRim novelisation well enough, and thought it handled some scenes better than the film while other scenes played better on-screen — but I’d say that this one

    enriches Rogue One. And I’ll say it again:

  • Alejandro
    Dec 28, 2016

    Usually when you read a novelization, the reading experience while entertained, since it’s a novelization from a movie script, you get basically the same thing that you get while watching the film,

    …here, isn’t the case!

    You hardly will believe that it wasn’t in the contrary, you’ll believe that this book may be the original novel from where they did the movie script!

    The author, Alexander Freed,

    Usually when you read a novelization, the reading experience while entertained, since it’s a novelization from a movie script, you get basically the same thing that you get while watching the film,

    …here, isn’t the case!

    You hardly will believe that it wasn’t in the contrary, you’ll believe that this book may be the original novel from where they did the movie script!

    The author, Alexander Freed, di dan awesome job developing a richful narrative where you got deeper into the thoughts and motivations of the characters, and also you get extended scenes from the ones that you watch in the film.

    So, if you loved the film (like me!), you’ll have a wonderful reading experience with this exceptional book. Definitely, the Force is strong in this one!

    During 20 years, the Galactic Empire has ruled over the galaxy, and the Rebel Alliance hasn’t make any relevant damage to the reigning structure. Even worse, as in any war, the Rebels have done unspeakable things seeking out a way to win the war, so the hope is dying and the white hats got dirty.

    And things will get only worse, since obtained Rebel intelligence reports indicate that the Emperor constructed a massive mobile combat station with the fearsome power to destroy entire planets!

    The Rebel Alliance need to confirm such incredible scenario and if so, to know about if there is any chance of stopping it, but to find the right people to such impossible task…

    …they’ll need to gather the right kind of rogues.

    Hope may be found in the most strange places and the unexpected people.

    An unlikely pack of rogues will be the only hope for the Rebel Alliance and the dream of freedom again in the galaxy…

    A young criminal, convicted for thievery and forgery, used to trust only in herself since all parent figure in her life has abandoned her or disappointed her.

    A Rebel Captain, whose moral north got displaced, after too many black ops missions, doing very bad things in the name of a good cause.

    An Imperial desertor, seeking a path of redemption, after too many years just following orders without questioning them.

    A blind man, who used to be a Guardian of the Whills, the sentinels of the Jedi Temple with Kyber Crystals, but now, with no more Jedi, reduced to be a market beggar.

    Chirrut’s best friend and reluctant bodyguard.

    A reprogrammed Imperial droid, to be used by the Rebel Alliance in infiltration missions. Cynical and sarcastic.

    They are from different background, they don’t trust each other, but they are the best hope for the Rebel Alliance (even if it doesn’t want to) to engage into the most dangerous missions of all…

    …to try to steal the schematics of the Death Star!

    In a galaxy, far far away, engulfed into the darkness of the Sith and the Galactic Empire, the light of hope is fading out…

    …but the Force works in mysterious ways.

    Since the beginning of the franchise, in the very opening crawl of

    , we knew about this daring mission…

    …now, finally we can learn the whole story that involved it!

  • pamsreading
    Jan 02, 2017

    Well done *clap clap*

    This book has a similar tone to

    book because of the poetic language. So if you are a fan of the style you will not be disappointed. Coincidentally, by the will of the Force, the narrator for the audiobook is the same person, Jonathan Davis, who did a suburb job at narrating both Revenge of the Sith and

    audiobooks. There are reviews stating that the novelisation does not provide EU materials unlike others, from both old and new canons

    Well done *clap clap*

    This book has a similar tone to

    book because of the poetic language. So if you are a fan of the style you will not be disappointed. Coincidentally, by the will of the Force, the narrator for the audiobook is the same person, Jonathan Davis, who did a suburb job at narrating both Revenge of the Sith and

    audiobooks. There are reviews stating that the novelisation does not provide EU materials unlike others, from both old and new canons, however the book provides the perspectives of

    which is well written, which, adds on emotional impact. If you like me, having masochism, cynicism, and haemophilic for tears, you will definitely love this. Cassian’s early assholesery resembles that of Thane Kyrell. Kaytoo reminds me of TCW Anakin, truly, and myself. Jyn is her own great thing. I don’t want to say something that sounds like she’s a shadow of other character but this is a genuine compliment, she reminds me of Ahsoka.

    1. There are two characters

    that I can relate to in a personal level (cynicism for the first one and loyalty and ability to make people antsy for the second, as well as gentleness and caring nature)

    2. Spirit mom & Warrior dad, noone told me they were married

    3. THE LANGUAGE, THE LITERATURE

    4. The Clone Wars atmosphere

    5. Daddy Death Star Tarkin & Anna Dramaqueen

    6. Anne copying Snips’ double pun from TCW and managing to make it a dad joke, thinking he’s savage af

    7. Smol son Bodhi

    8. Mon Mothma, both

    and Rogue One managed to make me love her, her understanding nature is a breath of fresh air unlike Yoda and Obi-Wan, in terms of leadership and humanity.

    9. Legit made me cry

    1. New fans running around screaming Jassian is the best and healthiest Star Wars ship ever and literally challenge other fans to name one that is better. You know what, the thing is Jyn and Cassian get one

    other people like:

    – Darman & Etain

    – Ciena & Thane

    – Anakin & Padme

    – Qui-Gon & Tahl

    . Deserved to but were not given the honour due to them. I would say this ship is fortunate enough to get an honourable close curtain. So, please be a decent individual and consider the fact that you are being treated fairly. Unlike others.

    2. In comparison to

    other Star Wars story Jyn Erso gets

    in which I will not argue against the point that she totally deserves it, hell she’s one great character.

    3. Where is Admiral Rae Sinnamonroll Sloane?

    4. The repetitive typos, it should have been wife or husband or beloved or partner or other half instead of the word brother during Chirrut and Baze scenes should it not?

    5. What the hell with the treatment of mothers in Star Wars? I have seen that once, twice, thrice, this is the third time.

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  • Les
    Dec 26, 2016

    For the combined reasons of not being able to wait to see the movie and being stuck in bed running a temperature with ‘flu, I read this novelization with interest and enthusiasm over the course of a couple of days. I’d seen the Rogue One movie trailers, of course, and some amazing concept artwork, which meant that I found myself with some comprehensive imagery for my mind’s eye to make use of. This definitely helped me speed through the story with no effort. With no detailed plot points or spoil

    For the combined reasons of not being able to wait to see the movie and being stuck in bed running a temperature with ‘flu, I read this novelization with interest and enthusiasm over the course of a couple of days. I’d seen the Rogue One movie trailers, of course, and some amazing concept artwork, which meant that I found myself with some comprehensive imagery for my mind’s eye to make use of. This definitely helped me speed through the story with no effort. With no detailed plot points or spoilers from the screen version to influence my thoughts, I was hitting to story with minimal preconception.

    To the book itself: I have to be honest and say, the first half of the book was very good and had me hooked from the kick off, but it just seemed to fall a little flat for the third quarter. This was taken up largely with the epic battle where Jyn Erso and her rebel comrades attempt to secure the plans for the Death Star. It just seemed to go on and on without really accomplishing much in terms of the story line. But, if action is your thing, you’re going to love it. Right near the end it came good again and I thought the end chapter (and particularly the Epilogue) was great, a fitting end to this story which is a stand alone but which also has hints of coming events in

    . We catch a glimpse of a few characters that we’ve seen and known before plus see others who are more prominent players like Tarkin and Vader.

    Overall it’s fine and I give it an actual 3.5 stars, but it’s not one of the best Star Wars novels that I’ve read. It’s a solid tale that fits nicely beside the main Star Wars story arc and fleshes out the universe with some good characters and other elements. I just felt that the story got bogged down a bit during that big battle phase. I’m still as eager as ever to see the movie, possibly even more so, and am equally as eager to see the what other projects that come out of the new and revitalized (a matter of some debate in fandom it would seem…) Star Wars franchise.

  • J. Else
    Jan 05, 2017

    I loved Rogue One. This novelization actually improves upon its source material. It fleshes out and clarifies some character motivations & intentions. Freed infuses each of the characters with more personality: Jyn’s driving need to find something to believe in and her complicated abandonment issues about both her fathers; Cassian’s guilt over actions he has done in the name of the rebellion; Chirrut strength and knowledge as a Guardian of the Whills along with his connection to Baze; the ef

    I loved Rogue One. This novelization actually improves upon its source material. It fleshes out and clarifies some character motivations & intentions. Freed infuses each of the characters with more personality: Jyn’s driving need to find something to believe in and her complicated abandonment issues about both her fathers; Cassian’s guilt over actions he has done in the name of the rebellion; Chirrut strength and knowledge as a Guardian of the Whills along with his connection to Baze; the effect of Jehda’s destruction through the eyes of nameless citizens as well as Baze; Bodhi’s life before and after meeting Galen Erso.

    The best novelizations contribute to their films rather than just being a shallow money-grabbing tie-in (almost anything recently written by Alan Dean Foster). The snippets of scenes that ended up on the cutting room floor are intriguing. While I would have like a little more time developing the relationship between Cassian and Jyn, particularly in the last chapter when their mission is finally over, all-in-all this is a fantastic book with strong characters and a gripping storyline.

    a completely new layer in the franchise, which serves to grey the line between the Rebellion versus Empire. Both organizations have hurt people in the name of their causes.

    I am so excited to read more books by Freed. Just as Rogue One’s director should do every subsequent Star Wars film, Alexander Freed should do every subsequent movie novelization. I loved these characters even more.

  • Bookworm Sean
    Jan 07, 2017

    A year ago I wrote an absolutely scathing review of the

    novelisation. I hated the thing; it was poor, and it felt like a tepid plot summary. It captured nothing of the movie. I was determined never to read a Star War novelisation again by the same author.

    So I was delighted to see that Alexander Freed was writing this one. I’ve already read

    and although the book wasn’t without its faults, it clearly showed much promise. Freed d

    A year ago I wrote an absolutely scathing review of the

    novelisation. I hated the thing; it was poor, and it felt like a tepid plot summary. It captured nothing of the movie. I was determined never to read a Star War novelisation again by the same author.

    So I was delighted to see that Alexander Freed was writing this one. I’ve already read

    and although the book wasn’t without its faults, it clearly showed much promise. Freed demonstrated his skill as a Star Wars writer; however, it is here that his true talent comes through. Not only as he captured the surface action of the film but he has also added much depth to it, which is something any decent novelisation should do. It should expand on what we already have rather than just regurgitate it.

    Indeed, in the film Jyn Erso is stoic. She is what the world, what her experience, has made her. I found Felicity Jones’ performance somewhat flat- not bad acting- but without life. Jyn is a person who has almost given up. She is without all hope till the very end of the film. The point is Freed did wonders of getting into her head, and explaining why she is like this: it is her way of surviving in a world of brutal opportunists. Her persona and interactions with the world make much more sense in this regard; we see more of who she actually is.

    The speed of the film is also captured here, the intensity of the action. Rogue One’s mission felt desperately important in the Star Wars timeline; it felt like the fate of the rebellion was on the shoulders of these few radicals, as it so desperately need to be. Not only that but the Krennic scenes were handled deftly. He really is an egotist. Against men like Tarkin and Vader, he was just a poser. Despite serving the Empire he was never truly loyal to it. The death star was his own vanity project; he wanted it for himself, which is why he could never have been the man to take charge of it. Tarkin existed for the Empire; there was no man beyond the uniform, a level of conformity Krennic never achieved.

    He trembled in the presence of Vader, again, something Tarkin would never do. He was a lesser officer, and a lesser man. But in terms of suitable villain for this story, he’s perfect. They couldn’t overly emphasise on Vader, so he’s a good stop gap. I don’t want to give a huge spoiler away, though I’m sure if you’re reading my review you’ve likely seen the film, but that ending! It’s the sort of ending that so many stories need but never actually get. It was brave. It was brutal. It was honest. And I loved it. Freed captured the heart of it here.

    Rogue one, both film and movie, were excellent. They were so much better than I imagined them to be. However, the main story arc is where it is at. I can’t wait for episode eight!

  • Nicole
    Jan 03, 2017

    REBELLIONS ARE BUILT ON HOPE – A REVIEW OF ROGUE ONE

    It’s a dark time for rebellion in a galaxy far, far away. Rumors of a huge weapon that the Empire is creating are keeping the Rebel Alliance Intelligence officers busy. One young woman, pulled from her home and family, holds the key to helping the Rebel Alliance keep the galaxy safe. Jyn Erso goes from chains to freedom in her pursuit to escape the Empire and follow the path to the weapon’s plans. Standing in Jyn’s way is the Empire’s own Orson

    REBELLIONS ARE BUILT ON HOPE – A REVIEW OF ROGUE ONE

    It’s a dark time for rebellion in a galaxy far, far away. Rumors of a huge weapon that the Empire is creating are keeping the Rebel Alliance Intelligence officers busy. One young woman, pulled from her home and family, holds the key to helping the Rebel Alliance keep the galaxy safe. Jyn Erso goes from chains to freedom in her pursuit to escape the Empire and follow the path to the weapon’s plans. Standing in Jyn’s way is the Empire’s own Orson Krennic, who leads the project and Jyn’s father, Galen, to creating the weapon that will tip the scales forever in the Empire’s favor.

    If you haven’t seen the movie, read this book so you get an idea of what is at stake–especially if you have seen Star Wars: A New Hope. If you have seen the movie, read this book so you can get some great character development on the Rebellion side and see a little more in-depth to the way things really work on the Imperial side.

    Author Alexander Freed takes readers through a logical progression of the movie, scene by scene, but the little snippets of things that ended up on the cutting room floor (or edited for time) are intriguing. I am so excited to read more books by Freed–it looks like he writes things related to video game properties.

    I am so completely happy that I picked up this book–it was so worth it!

    Who would read this: Fans of Star Wars and associated properties, people who missed out on the movie, fans of strong female characters and books who pass the Bechdel test. Anyone ten-ish and up who enjoyed the movie.

    Time to Read: The novelization of Rogue One, took just a little over 4 hours–which is just under double it’s 2 hour and 13 minute running time.

    Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars–I seriously enjoyed all aspects of this novel, much more than I thought I might.

    Funny Story: I read the novelization of The Force Awakens (review here) and determined just how much might have been left on the cutting room floor. This (and a giftcard from my husband) propelled me to pick up Rogue One‘s novelization and I really enjoyed the time spent with the development of the secondary characters–in particular, the Pilot and Mon Mothma.

    Final thoughts: Alexander Freed did a great job with this book! I wish I had picked it up sooner, but I decided to pick this as my first book of 2017. If this years reads are anything like Rogue One, I am in a great spot!

    If you would like to purchase this book, it is available at your favorite retailer in your favorite format.

    May the Force be with you in 2017!

  • James
    Jan 07, 2017

    *Some Spoilers ahead *

    ** Everything below is opinion**

    Some might think me mad but I didn’t like Rogue One anywhere near as much as I’m ‘told’ I should have. I’m a Star Wars fan- bigger than most believe it or not and I’m happy to say that I like every single film from The Phantom Menace to Return of the Jedi. I do not subscribe to the fallacy that ‘the prequels are garbage’ nor did I believe that Rogue One was a bad movie I thought it was a very good movie but not a great Star Wars movie.

    I’ve s

    *Some Spoilers ahead *

    ** Everything below is opinion**

    Some might think me mad but I didn’t like Rogue One anywhere near as much as I’m ‘told’ I should have. I’m a Star Wars fan- bigger than most believe it or not and I’m happy to say that I like every single film from The Phantom Menace to Return of the Jedi. I do not subscribe to the fallacy that ‘the prequels are garbage’ nor did I believe that Rogue One was a bad movie I thought it was a very good movie but not a great Star Wars movie.

    I’ve seen Rogue One twice now in cinema liking it merely a small amount more the second time around and I’ve read the novelisation here as well as its prequel Catalyst which incidentally I preferred. My problem with Rogue One I think is the characters- some do it for me like Chirrut, Baze, Bohdi and K2SO but main character Jyn Erso and Cassian Andor I found deplorable. Both characters seemed devoid of any form of human emotion even after both losing so much in their lives and becoming people they didn’t wish to be; I kept wondering why K2SO the droid had more humanity than both put together. Jyn is a pair of trousers- a protagonist much like one could play in a Role Playing Game; she’s dispensable and is merely a dull cog in the engine. What bugs me about Jyn is the fact that her parents- Galen and Lyra both had more fleshed out lives and personalities than her though not a more interesting life. Cassian just didn’t strike it well for me either- I’m meant to feel sorry for this man who’s lost so much to the empire that he sacrifices his own morality to destroy the enemy; henceforth becoming a murderer, spy and saboteur for the cause and I’m meant to see the heroism in his moral eye-opening and his redemption- but I don’t not even for a moment because his character has next to no defining qualities other than the fact he can hold a gun and fight for ‘the good guys.’ At least K2 had some of the brilliant Alan Tudyk humor that I’d come to expect from the actor and Chirrut and Baze at least had a past they’d been forcibly torn from- plus Chirrut being the only character reminiscent to the Jedi in the story; though I can hardly blame the writer for that as this particular chapter is meant to be the moments before a new hope- the moments without hope.

    Furthermore, the movie did struggle to get me to care about the events unfolding- this is the death star and its destruction kills thousands and eventually millions but Rogue One didn’t brace the audience for that monumental impact of severe genocides. I wasn’t made to care when Jedha City was destroyed and so many lives were lost- especially the life of Saw Guerrera; the man who basically raised Jyn. A New Hope manages to capture the severity of the Death Star’s power in a few seconds (I’m referring to the scene when Obi-Wan senses Alderan’s destruction where millions of voices are silenced.) Rogue One had an entire movie to do this and in my honest opinion didn’t manage it.

    I’ll end on a high note- I give this 3 out of 5 despite not massively enjoying it because some of the things it did right it did on a brilliant scale. The battles were gorgeous and truly reminded me of the battle of Hoth in The Empire Strikes back and the new planets were breathtaking- I loved the tropical beauty of Scariff and the new shore troopers which invaded her soil. I loved every scene with Wilhuff Tarkin and his usurping of Orson Krennick who would forever more be known only as the ‘fall guy’ and not the arrogant genius who brought the death star into fruition- plus the Tarkin CGI was astonishing, though the same probably couldn’t be said the same for Leia.

    And of course… the best till last. Darth Vader. Vader’s presence in Rogue One is breathtaking and terrifying as he commands every second of the audience’s attention whether on screen or page. Vader is just as driven and evil as we remember him with his words often dripping with sarcasm and ire and that- was what Rogue One did very well.

  • Julie
    Jan 06, 2017

    It took me about 100 pages to get into this story because there are so many characters and the beginning of the book is primarily about espionage. When I think of Star Wars, I think of Jedi not spies. All of it is build up for a fast paced nearly impossible mission that just absolutely grabs you and does not let go. Once I got to around 100 pages I read through to the end nonstop because I had to know how it ended!

    What I loved is that every character on this unlikely team is necessary to complet

    It took me about 100 pages to get into this story because there are so many characters and the beginning of the book is primarily about espionage. When I think of Star Wars, I think of Jedi not spies. All of it is build up for a fast paced nearly impossible mission that just absolutely grabs you and does not let go. Once I got to around 100 pages I read through to the end nonstop because I had to know how it ended!

    What I loved is that every character on this unlikely team is necessary to complete a mission that will aid in defeating the Death Star. It is truly a team effort but it takes awhile before everyone trusts each other.

    As for the family drama, all I will say is that Jyn has two fathers, her estranged maternal father and her estranged adoptive father. There’s many issues that need worked out with both of them. Most of this is done through Jyn’s eternal monologue that you simply aren’t likely to find in the movie.

    I’m really glad I read this novelization before seeing the movie because it explained so much more than the movie does. I spent nearly a half hour explaining to my son information that he didn’t have from just watching the movie.

    I also cried at least three times while reading this novel. I wish I could explain what made me so emotional but they would all be HUGE spoilers. I will just say a mission like this requires sacrifice. Hopefully that doesn’t give too much away.

    However, I do wish I had read Catalyst – A Rogue One Novel by James Luceno before reading this book. Catalyst tells the story leading up to the events in Rogue One. Even so the book stands well on it’s own. this is true even if you know nothing about the Star Wars universe. What’s interesting is Catalyst, Rogue One and A New Hope (Episode IV) make up a trilogy of their own. So it’s like a trilogy inception because Episodes I – III make up the first trilogy and Episodes IV – VI make up the second trilogy.