admin   February 22, 2017   No Comments on


Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER – Go beyond the film with a novelization featuring new scenes and expanded material. As the shadows of the Empire loom ever larger across the galaxy, so do deeply troubling rumors. The Rebellion has learned of a sinister Imperial plot to bring entire worlds to their knees. Deep in Empire-dominated space, a machine of unimaginable destructive powe…

Title : Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
Author : Alexander Freed
Rating :
ISBN : 0399178457
Edition Language : English
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 319 pages

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story Reviews

  • Callunah
    Dec 20, 2016

    One of the best Star Wars novelization, second only to the outstanding Revenge of the Sith. Instead of merely regurgitating the screenplay with a few deleted scenes thrown in, Alexander Freed adds motivation and depth to the characters that you can’t get in a movie. Jyn’s motivations are more chaotic than they seem in the movie. Cassian is far more conflicted. Everyone from hero to villain gets fleshed out and enhanced.

    My favorite things are the Supplemental Data sprinkled throughout. Everything

    One of the best Star Wars novelization, second only to the outstanding Revenge of the Sith. Instead of merely regurgitating the screenplay with a few deleted scenes thrown in, Alexander Freed adds motivation and depth to the characters that you can’t get in a movie. Jyn’s motivations are more chaotic than they seem in the movie. Cassian is far more conflicted. Everyone from hero to villain gets fleshed out and enhanced.

    My favorite things are the Supplemental Data sprinkled throughout. Everything from an excerpt from a history of Jedha to bitchy communiques between Tarkin and Krennick. My favorite are the memos going back and forth between Galen and Death Star middle management.

    If you enjoyed the movie, read this novelization. It will add so much to the story.

  • Julie
    Dec 23, 2016

    I was hard-pressed to choose a flagship

    I was hard-pressed to choose a flagship quote for my review, because I highlighted literally 97 of them(!), but I went for this one because it illustrates some of the Rogue One team dynamic

    a subtle detail that I missed while watching.

    First off, don’t read this novelisation until you’ve seen the film! But listen to me: I

    the movie, and this actually improves upon its source material. It clarifies some character motivations & intentions, fleshes them out a bit more, makes you care about them even more. Freed infuses each of the characters with more personality: Jyn’s driving need to find something to believe in, her complicated abandonment issues about both her fathers; Saw Gerrera’s own noble, half-mad convictions; Cassian’s guilt complexes; Baze’s bitter fury; Chirrut’s wry humour; even Bodhi’s gambling problems. Alan Dean Foster’s The Force Awakens’ novelisation was garbage, but Freed’s prose is lovely; Cassian’s opening scene is almost noir-like in his interrogation of an informant on a dark and seedy station.

    Freed also has a great grasp on character voice, which seeps into the narration. You can hear in Galen Erso’s thoughts that the man is robotic and analytical; K-2SO is clipped and cynical as he calculates his way to conclusions; Orson Krennic has a slimy, unctuous arrogance to his narration. There are some POV chapters from aliens, too, which remind you that even their thought processes differ from humans on a species level.

    The sheer desperation and diversity of the Rebel Alliance is on full display, all of their leaders struggling with finding the right approach to an unstoppable war machine. I loved seeing more from characters like Mon Mothma and General Draven.

    And in seeing the narrative focus on the Empire’s race to develop the Death Star, as well, I was reminded of WWII’s nuclear arms-race, like a chilling commentary on our own use of inconceivable might and atrocity. In the words of Galen Erso himself: “My colleagues, many of them, have fooled themselves into thinking they are creating something so terrible and powerful it will never be used. But they’re wrong. No weapon has ever been left on the shelf.”

    When the Death Star

    unleashed for the first time… it has so much more emotional effect than it did in the film. In the movie, it’s a fantastic visual, a thrilling chase scene to escape. Whereas in the novelisation, I found myself getting teary on the subway for throwaway bystanders; it drove in the impact so that you

    it, you see the lives snuffed out. It’s a series of horrors, but the one that actually got me worst was the Imperial stormtroopers left behind by their own callous empire, because fuuuuck:

    And like the

    novelisation, chapters here are abridged with epistolary interludes that do a tremendous job of worldbuilding the Alliance and Empire: communiques back and forth, reports on planets and people, showing the inner workings of these organisations. Possibly my very favourite section of the

    were the slew of memos back and forth between Galen, Krennic, and an exasperated Death Star QA technician. You actually get to see how Galen masterfully exploits reverse psychology, tight project deadlines and therefore cutting corners, and pressure from Imperial higher-ups to lay his trap & sabotage the project, all while sounding like he’s arguing for the exact opposite, and

    It’s fantastic.

    The ending is a series of successive punches to the heart, and I finished the book crying in bed. I’m happily going to read everything else Freed has written now tbh (I’m excited for

    especially, because WAR FEELS).

    The best novelisations contribute to their films rather than just being a shallow money-grab tie-in, and I’m happy to say that this is a stellar example of the former. I liked the PacRim novelisation well enough, and thought it handled some scenes better than the film while other scenes played better on-screen — but I’d say that this one

    enriches Rogue One. And I’ll say it again:

  • Alejandro
    Dec 27, 2016

    Usually when you read a novelization, the reading experience while entertained, since it’s a novelization from a movie script, you get basically the same thing that you get while watching the film,

    …here, isn’t the case!

    You hardly will believe that it wasn’t in the contrary, you’ll believe that this book may be the original novel from where they did the movie script!

    The author, Alexander Freed,

    Usually when you read a novelization, the reading experience while entertained, since it’s a novelization from a movie script, you get basically the same thing that you get while watching the film,

    …here, isn’t the case!

    You hardly will believe that it wasn’t in the contrary, you’ll believe that this book may be the original novel from where they did the movie script!

    The author, Alexander Freed, di dan awesome job developing a richful narrative where you got deeper into the thoughts and motivations of the characters, and also you get extended scenes from the ones that you watch in the film.

    So, if you loved the film (like me!), you’ll have a wonderful reading experience with this exceptional book. Definitely, the Force is strong in this one!

    During 20 years, the Galactic Empire has ruled over the galaxy, and the Rebel Alliance hasn’t make any relevant damage to the reigning structure. Even worse, as in any war, the Rebels have done unspeakable things seeking out a way to win the war, so the hope is dying and the white hats got dirty.

    And things will get only worse, since obtained Rebel intelligence reports indicate that the Emperor constructed a massive mobile combat station with the fearsome power to destroy entire planets!

    The Rebel Alliance need to confirm such incredible scenario and if so, to know about if there is any chance of stopping it, but to find the right people to such impossible task…

    …they’ll need to gather the right kind of rogues.

    Hope may be found in the most strange places and the unexpected people.

    An unlikely pack of rogues will be the only hope for the Rebel Alliance and the dream of freedom again in the galaxy…

    A young criminal, convicted for thievery and forgery, used to trust only in herself since all parent figure in her life has abandoned her or disappointed her.

    A Rebel Captain, whose moral north got displaced, after too many black ops missions, doing very bad things in the name of a good cause.

    An Imperial desertor, seeking a path of redemption, after too many years just following orders without questioning them.

    A blind man, who used to be a Guardian of the Whills, the sentinels of the Jedi Temple with Kyber Crystals, but now, with no more Jedi, reduced to be a market beggar.

    Chirrut’s best friend and reluctant bodyguard.

    A reprogrammed Imperial droid, to be used by the Rebel Alliance in infiltration missions. Cynical and sarcastic.

    They are from different background, they don’t trust each other, but they are the best hope for the Rebel Alliance (even if it doesn’t want to) to engage into the most dangerous missions of all…

    …to try to steal the schematics of the Death Star!

    In a galaxy, far far away, engulfed into the darkness of the Sith and the Galactic Empire, the light of hope is fading out…

    …but the Force works in mysterious ways.

    Since the beginning of the franchise, in the very opening crawl of

    , we knew about this daring mission…

    …now, finally we can learn the whole story that involved it!

  • Ashley
    Jan 19, 2017

    If you’ve read any reviews of this book, what I’m about to say is probably something you’ve heard before: This is one of the best film novelizations I’ve ever read, if not

    best. Oy, that sounds really hyperbolic, and to be fair, it’s really not a high bar to clear. People aren’t going around screaming for the next great novelization. They just aren’t. Also, the novelization for

    was quite terrible, so psychologically speaking, pretty much if this one had been halfway decent

    If you’ve read any reviews of this book, what I’m about to say is probably something you’ve heard before: This is one of the best film novelizations I’ve ever read, if not

    best. Oy, that sounds really hyperbolic, and to be fair, it’s really not a high bar to clear. People aren’t going around screaming for the next great novelization. They just aren’t. Also, the novelization for

    was quite terrible, so psychologically speaking, pretty much if this one had been halfway decent I was going to enjoy it a lot, just as a contrast in opposite experiences.

    But I also think those are just a couple of small factors that increased my enjoyment of this book. Mostly it’s just really effing good. If you liked the movie and don’t normally read novelizations, I would still urge you to think about checking this one out. Decent novelizations retell the plot of a movie in a coherent, enjoyable way, not detracting from the meaning or themes of the original work. Good novelizations add something to the process. Great ones go just a step further. For me this book is unquestionably a “great novelization*”. Alexander Freed’s writing adds nuance to an already nuanced story. It adds excitement and depth. It goes where the movie, by its nature, can’t. (Just as books can’t offer us sweeping visuals and beautiful soundtracks, or convey that ineffable quality a great actor has to pull you in to a story without realizing why.) He enhances the character moments by going deep into their heads, and the way he structures the narrative (books can’t really do jump-cuts and such) enforces the tragic yet hopeful nature of the ending. Like, I cried while reading this, and I didn’t even do that while watching the film.

    I will give you an example. It’s small and probably won’t work as well for you if you haven’t read the preceding pages this sequence of lines are meant to cap off, but it’s probably the best way for me to show you what I’m talking about when I talk about the style of this book. Major spoilers ahoy for the end of

    , so don’t read any further if you haven’t seen it yet.

    It’s just so small and perfect a moment, and it’s a moment only a book could have given you. Freed plays the whole story like that, actually adapting the material and creating the feelings that the film evoked through filmic devices by using literary ones instead. It’s also pretty apparent he was working off a script, not the final cut, because there are scenes missing from the movie that are included here, or that are extended (like Jyn being confronted by a TIE fighter while trying to send the signal out, a scene which was in the trailer but not the movie).

    Freed has previously written one book in the new Star Wars canon (

    ), and I wasn’t planning on reading it before, but if it’s anything like his work here, I’m thinking I need to check it out after all.

    [4.5 stars]

  • Daniel
    Jan 08, 2017

    Kada uzmete ovu knjigu dobijate tačno ono što ste i očekivali: prepričan film. Ni manje ni više što je po meni velika propuštena prilika da se ova priča proširi i da se gomila rupa fino popuni.

    Sa druge strane knjiga je kompetentno napisana i odlično je prenešena atmosfera filma.

    Sve u svemu dobra adaptacija ali manje više nepotrebna.

    PS: Još jedna stvar koja mi nje legla je nekako nedostatak humora kojeg ima dosta u filmu a ovde se slabo nalazi. Moguće da je problem pošto je dosta humora bilo neve

    Kada uzmete ovu knjigu dobijate tačno ono što ste i očekivali: prepričan film. Ni manje ni više što je po meni velika propuštena prilika da se ova priča proširi i da se gomila rupa fino popuni.

    Sa druge strane knjiga je kompetentno napisana i odlično je prenešena atmosfera filma.

    Sve u svemu dobra adaptacija ali manje više nepotrebna.

    PS: Još jedna stvar koja mi nje legla je nekako nedostatak humora kojeg ima dosta u filmu a ovde se slabo nalazi. Moguće da je problem pošto je dosta humora bilo neverbalno pa pisac nije mogao da fino prenese a da nas ne zatrpa sa previše teksta.

  • Rahmi
    Jan 18, 2017

    Perfect. One of the most beautiful things I’ve ever read :’)

  • Bookworm Sean
    Dec 28, 2016

    A year ago I wrote an absolutely scathing review of the

    novelisation. I hated the thing; it was poor, and it felt like a tepid plot summary. It captured nothing of the movie. I was determined never to read a Star War novelisation again by the same author.

    So I was delighted to see that Alexander Freed was writing this one. I’ve already read

    and although the book wasn’t without its faults, it clearly showed much promise. Freed d

    A year ago I wrote an absolutely scathing review of the

    novelisation. I hated the thing; it was poor, and it felt like a tepid plot summary. It captured nothing of the movie. I was determined never to read a Star War novelisation again by the same author.

    So I was delighted to see that Alexander Freed was writing this one. I’ve already read

    and although the book wasn’t without its faults, it clearly showed much promise. Freed demonstrated his skill as a Star Wars writer; however, it is here that his true talent comes through. Not only as he captured the surface action of the film but he has also added much depth to it, which is something any decent novelisation should do. It should expand on what we already have rather than just regurgitate it.

    Indeed, in the film Jyn Erso is stoic. She is what the world, what her experience, has made her. I found Felicity Jones’ performance somewhat flat- not bad acting- but without life. Jyn is a person who has almost given up. She is without all hope till the very end of the film. The point is Freed did wonders of getting into her head, and explaining why she is like this: it is her way of surviving in a world of brutal opportunists. Her persona and interactions with the world make much more sense in this regard; we see more of who she actually is.

    The speed of the film is also captured here, the intensity of the action. Rogue One’s mission felt desperately important in the Star Wars timeline; it felt like the fate of the rebellion was on the shoulders of these few radicals, as it so desperately need to be. Not only that but the Krennic scenes were handled deftly. He really is an egotist. Against men like Tarkin and Vader, he was just a poser. Despite serving the Empire he was never truly loyal to it. The death star was his own vanity project; he wanted it for himself, which is why he could never have been the man to take charge of it. Tarkin existed for the Empire; there was no man beyond the uniform, a level of conformity Krennic never achieved.

    He trembled in the presence of Vader, again, something Tarkin would never do. He was a lesser officer, and a lesser man. But in terms of suitable villain for this story, he’s perfect. They couldn’t overly emphasise on Vader, so he’s a good stop gap. I don’t want to give a huge spoiler away, though I’m sure if you’re reading my review you’ve likely seen the film, but that ending! It’s the sort of ending that so many stories need but never actually get. It was brave. It was brutal. It was honest. And I loved it. Freed captured the heart of it here.

    Rogue one, both film and movie, were excellent. They were so much better than I imagined them to be. However, the main story arc is where it is at. I can’t wait for episode eight!

  • Shadowdenizen
    Dec 28, 2016

    I might be in the minority, but I did’t care for the movie, and I liked the book only marginally better. (Best not to even get me started….)

    Where I found Rey, Finn and Poe immediately charming and likable, I found Jyn to be rather inscrutable and ultimately one-dimensional. (But, to it’s credit, the book does serve to humanize her a bit.)

  • Hannah
    Jan 19, 2017

    HONESTLY this book was not only a great Star Wars book (probably one of the best I have read?), but also something I would recommend as a book-book. Let’s be real here, the EU has set the bar pretty low over the years, so what I look for in a SW novel is not always what I’m looking for in my other reading choices, but this nailed both.

    The prose is wonderful. Freed has a knack for not only getting into a character’s skin, but making you feel like you’re right there with them. Action scenes are ki

    HONESTLY this book was not only a great Star Wars book (probably one of the best I have read?), but also something I would recommend as a book-book. Let’s be real here, the EU has set the bar pretty low over the years, so what I look for in a SW novel is not always what I’m looking for in my other reading choices, but this nailed both.

    The prose is wonderful. Freed has a knack for not only getting into a character’s skin, but making you feel like you’re right there with them. Action scenes are kinetic, but have the weight of the character experiencing them as well – were not blowing shit up here to look cool, we’re doing it For The Rebellion. You’re given a sense and awareness of the personal toll the Empire has taken on each character, and the different ways in which it did so.

    Leading on from that, this is a very character-driven book. Plot wasn’t the strongest point of the movie and the book doesn’t really expand on it at all, but if you walked away from Rogue One thinking ‘MAN I LOVED ALL OF THOSE PEOPLE’ this is the book for you. We just get a lot

    of each character – a little bit of backstory, and a lot bit of impetus and drive and relationships with other characters. Everything we see in the movie is expanded upon without contradicting – I never got the sense of ‘wait what, where did that come from’ that is so common with book versions of movies.

    That said, the movie had its problems and those are reflected in the book as well. There’s a dearth of lady characters (two (or three, counting Lyra), vs a million dudes), and Bor Gullet makes no sense (if you haven’t seen the movie, just. Trust me, it makes no sense). I did get the sense that Freed was trying to do his best with a motive for Lyra’s plotline, but it was one of those tropes that really can’t be saved.

    The one thing that r e a l l y bugged me was the narrative’s insistence on referring to two characters as brothers, when they have been pretty clearly coded as queer and together, not only in the movie but in the book itself. It’s a bit jarring to read, athough not surprising considering…hollywood. The chances of ever getting that relationship confirmed were always going to be slim, but I do wish that Freed had just left it ambiguous per the movie, rather than sliding in a few NO HOMO brothers quotes.

    What we

    get is a more explicit intensity of emotion between the two leads. I suppose you could still skate around calling it a romance if you wanted to, but I’d prefer to called it URT (unresolved romantic tension). Even more clearly than the movie, you’re given the impression that if only there had been more

    , something could come of it. I’m always in favour of anything with the vaguest hint of romance tbh, so this sat well with me and was something that i thorough enjoyed (as evidence by my Ao3 account lmao)

    FINALLY, I really enjoyed the extra datapad notes, journals, emails, histories that were inserted between each chapter. It gave you a sense of the galactic nature of what turned out to be an extremely personal story. There were a

    of POVs in this book, but Freed handled them with grace, and I never felt as though I didn’t recognise a character either from the movie, or their thread in the book. Having the greater context of the Star Wars universe in the little excerpts was a great way of conveying the many and varied POVs and information that are easier to do with a movie in a few shots.

    Overall, most of the flaws I found in the book were issues I had with the movie, and the book expanded/improved upon basically everything I loved about said movie. If you’ve never read a Star Wars book, this one is great to start with – it’s relatively stand alone, and if you’re familiar with even half of the movies you’ll be able to follow along easily. And if you loved the movie, you’ll almost definitely love the book. Highly recommended on all fronts.

  • Scott Rhee
    Feb 08, 2017

    This is NOT a review of the film “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story”, Gareth Edwards’s masterfully directed entry in the “Star Wars” filmography. Suffice it to say, about the film: I loved it, thought it was the best in the series. It was somewhat darker, more violent, less campy than the original “Star Wars” but still in keeping with the true vibe of the original series. It also helped explain some giant unexplained plot holes in “Episode IV: A New Hope”, especially in regard to how the Rebel Allian

    This is NOT a review of the film “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story”, Gareth Edwards’s masterfully directed entry in the “Star Wars” filmography. Suffice it to say, about the film: I loved it, thought it was the best in the series. It was somewhat darker, more violent, less campy than the original “Star Wars” but still in keeping with the true vibe of the original series. It also helped explain some giant unexplained plot holes in “Episode IV: A New Hope”, especially in regard to how the Rebel Alliance was able to blow up a planet-destroying weapon the size of a moon by dropping a bomb through a 3-inch wide air vent. That shit’s been bothering die-hard fans for almost 40 years. So, yay! (Sorry if I’m giving spoilers away for “A New Hope” but if you haven’t seen it by now, I’m guessing it’s by choice and you probably aren’t reading this review anyway…)

    Okay, so that

    a review of the film, albeit a very brief one. the bulk of this review, however, will be about the book “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” by Alexander Freed.

    Technically, Freed’s book is a novelization of the screenplay by Chris Weitz and Tony Gilroy. It is, essentially, the movie in written form, minus all the stage directions, camera shots, dialogue, etc. that one would find in a screenplay.

    Freed has done something pretty damn interesting, though. He has written a novel based on a film. To call this a novelization would be inaccurate. And unjust. This is a novel, and a damn good one.

    I have stated before, in previous reviews, that, while I enjoy reading the occasional novelization, the vast majority of them don’t provide anything too new or different than the movie from which they are adapted. Their sole purpose, oftentimes, is to simply get one psyched about watching the movie again. There is nothing wrong with that. A good novelization reminds fans of how much they enjoyed the movie.

    Freed goes one step further and does something that is rare but not completely unheard of in novelizations.

    Something that movies don’t do so well that books do really well is provide an interior world, a world of the character’s thoughts and feelings and dreams. Books can also provide immediate context: background stories, experiences, significant references that can flesh out a character in ways that two-dimensional visuals can’t. Movies are almost always told from a third-person limited perspective, while books have the luxury of being able to capture an omniscient perspective.

    Freed does that.

    His novel takes the familiar main characters from the movie—Jyn Erso, Cassian Andor, Orson Krennic—and fleshes them out into fuller and more rounded characters. He also does this with the supporting roles—Bodhi Rook, Baze Malbus, Chirrut Imwe, Saw Gerrera, and Mon Mothma.

    This is especially helpful to those of us who have not seen the TV shows

    and

    . (Both shows apparently help to explain Saw Gerrera’s backstory.) It’s also helpful for those who have not read the numerous Star Wars novels. (In the “old canon” series, Mon Mothma becomes the president of the New Republic, which eventually replaces the Empire.)

    Reading James Luceno’s prequel novel “Catalyst” is also useful, as it explains the deeper relationship between Krennic and Jyn’s father, Galen Erso.

    Freed deftly ties in all the references and explanations he can without bogging the story down with exposition. More importantly, though, he provides far more addendum to the story than, I’m sure, was even hinted at in the screenplay. It’s all for the better.

    There are, of course, additional “deleted” scenes that were probably in the screenplay and perhaps even filmed but cut from the theatrical version. Some, however, I would hazard a guess were manufactured by Freed’s own imagination.

    I have been sadly disappointed with the several novels that I have read within the “new canon” since J.J. Abram’s “Episode VII: The Force Awakens”. The only two bright spots for me, thus far, have been the novels “Star Wars Battlefront: Twilight Company” and this one, both of them—surprise!—written by Freed.

    If Freed were signed on to write every single subsequent Star Wars novel from here on, I would be plenty happy.