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Ms. Marvel, Vol. 6: Civil War II

Ms. Marvel, Vol. 6: Civil War II

While CIVIL WAR II brews, the next generation of Avengers has bigger things to worry about – like a tri-state academic competition! As rival schools clash, Ms. Marvel’s teammates Spider-Man and Nova are now her enemies! But when Kamala gets called to the real battle’s front line, she faces a fight she can’t embiggen her way out of. She’s about to learn a valuable lesson: N…

Title : Ms. Marvel, Vol. 6: Civil War II
Author : G. Willow Wilson
Rating :
ISBN : 0785196129
Edition Language : English
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 136 pages

Ms. Marvel, Vol. 6: Civil War II Reviews

  • Sesana
    Jan 08, 2017

    This was great. I don’t know if Civil War 2 overall will live up to its potential, but in this volume, it does what the original Civil War event tried and failed to do. It presents a legitimately interesting moral dilemma and it doesn’t (so far!) present either side as being ultimately good and right. This book in particular does a pretty good job of showing both sides of the argument.

    It also plays out what has been Kamala’s basic struggle almost from the beginning of her book: balancing her no

    This was great. I don’t know if Civil War 2 overall will live up to its potential, but in this volume, it does what the original Civil War event tried and failed to do. It presents a legitimately interesting moral dilemma and it doesn’t (so far!) present either side as being ultimately good and right. This book in particular does a pretty good job of showing both sides of the argument.

    It also plays out what has been Kamala’s basic struggle almost from the beginning of her book: balancing her normal life and her super life. And this is the point where it all goes very, very wrong. It’s a little tough to read, especially if you love Kamala like I do. I also liked how Wilson brought in the history of Kamala’s family. But my favorite issue had to be the souped up science fair, which brings Kamala and her Jersey City friends in conflict with Miles Morales and his Brooklyn classmates. It’s a fun issue, and this collection really needed a fun issue.

  • Stewart Tame
    Mar 21, 2017

    Hmm … This volume seems to be my least favorite of Kamala’s adventures. It’s bookended by a couple of standalone stories that are every bit as enjoyable as the rest of this series has been, but the bulk of this book … just didn’t do much for me. It smacks of change purely for the sake of stirring things up, and has this weird Afterschool Special vibe to it to boot. Thanks to a boy with precognitive abilities, crimes can be predicted before they happen, and Carol Danvers sets up a group, head

    Hmm … This volume seems to be my least favorite of Kamala’s adventures. It’s bookended by a couple of standalone stories that are every bit as enjoyable as the rest of this series has been, but the bulk of this book … just didn’t do much for me. It smacks of change purely for the sake of stirring things up, and has this weird Afterschool Special vibe to it to boot. Thanks to a boy with precognitive abilities, crimes can be predicted before they happen, and Carol Danvers sets up a group, headed by Ms. Marvel, to arrest people before anything happens. Yeah. To Kamala’s credit, she recognizes what a dubious idea this is. Eventually. I just have a difficult time believing that anyone, especially Carol, would take this scheme seriously enough to put it into action. Yes, it’s the same basic concept as Philip K. Dick’s classic short story, “The Minority Report,” but, unlike that story, no effort is put into making us believe that enough people would go for the concept of pre-arresting people to get such a program going. I dunno. Maybe if I were familiar with recent Captain Marvel storylines I’d understand better where Carol is coming from, but … No. Just no. I can believe Dick’s vision of some hypothetical future, but something set ostensibly in the “real” world, or at least as close to it as the Marvel Universe (and New Jersey) gets ..? Uh uh. Given the overall quality of the Ms. Marvel series so far, I’m sure this is just a temporary aberration.

  • Ashley
    Jan 25, 2017

    I will admit I was prepared to dislike this. I read a couple of reviews that gave the plot away, and it made me angry and nervous (more on this below). I shouldn’t have *really* worried. As she did with that whole Secret Wars mess, G. Willow Wilson manages to write an event tie-in story (in this case, Civil War II) but still keep it readable for people like myself who aren’t planning on reading the rest of it, and to simultaneously keep the story focused tightly on Kamala. This still felt like K

    I will admit I was prepared to dislike this. I read a couple of reviews that gave the plot away, and it made me angry and nervous (more on this below). I shouldn’t have *really* worried. As she did with that whole Secret Wars mess, G. Willow Wilson manages to write an event tie-in story (in this case, Civil War II) but still keep it readable for people like myself who aren’t planning on reading the rest of it, and to simultaneously keep the story focused tightly on Kamala. This still felt like Kamala’s story, a personal struggle as opposed to one full of empty action and violence. She also makes some devastating story choices that lend the events weight and lets us know this whole THING is going to have consequences.

    Also, even in the midst of heartbreaking events (seriously, ow, my poor baby Kamala) this made me LAUGH. Out loud in public. Several times. I just love Wilson’s style, and the attitude and heart she brings towards this character and her world. She takes the Civil War storyline and makes it personal for the volume, and for Kamala.

    The first issue starts out very lighthearted, with Kamala and her friends at a science fair trying to win scholarships, and their competition is Miles Morales and his friends. Kamala knows his secret identity, but he doesn’t know hers. This issue definitely got the most laughs (and I fucking love Skyshark. SKYSHARK).

    Wilson sort of eases you into the heroes fighting heroes concept with this science fair battle, after which the real shit starts. Nobody apparently saw

    in the Marvel universe, because a new Inhuman named Ulysses who supposedly predicts future crimes is now being championed by Captain Marvel as a way to prevent crimes from even happening. At first Kamala is all for this, but when she actually goes to start enforcing Ulysses’ predictions, it quickly becomes apparent that things aren’t as black and white as her hero, Carol Danvers, led her to believe. What follows is a series of events that culminate in

    It was all very compelling, even as I was upset to an almost ridiculous degree by what was going on.

    In fact, my only real problem with this volume is something that was forced on the story by outside circumstances, and that is the behavior/character assassination of Carol Danvers. I love Carol Danvers. Love her. And this does not feel like something she would do to me. This is not the Carol I love. I know I stopped reading her books after DeConnick left, so I might have missed something, but I just can’t with this whole storyline. It doesn’t feel earned. It feels wrong. It feels like they wanted to create a new Civil War II and needed someone besides Cap to fight with Tony, and here comes Carol.

    I have no doubt that Kamala and Ms. Marvel will weather this storm. It continues to be an excellent series. I hope Wilson never leaves. The same can’t be said of my love for Captain Marvel. I’m sadly feeling my decision not to continue reading her comics anymore was justified. I hope the movie version hands the comics their asses.

    A superhero comic with a female lead.[“br”]>[“br”]>[“br”]>[“br”]>[“br”]>[“br”]>[“br”]>[“br”]>[“br”]>[“br”]>[“br”]>[“br”]>[“br”]>[“br”]>

  • LadyBlue
    Aug 12, 2016

    I like the point about profiling and how the future is less than predictable.

    10%, to be exact!

    It also has so much nuance and interpersonal relationship development and character growth.

    This is seriously one of the best ones Marvel has out right now.

  • Ken Moten
    Oct 26, 2016

    This completes, I think, this title’s finest storyline so far. In

    , we see Kamala Khan’s work/life balance start to go dangerously out-of-wack and it is in this volume that she finally reaches her breaking-point. I read

    this year and if there was one quote that came to mind while reading Ms. Marvel’s trials it was: “

    .” She sees every single attempt at being a superhero and being “solider” for her he

    This completes, I think, this title’s finest storyline so far. In

    , we see Kamala Khan’s work/life balance start to go dangerously out-of-wack and it is in this volume that she finally reaches her breaking-point. I read

    this year and if there was one quote that came to mind while reading Ms. Marvel’s trials it was: “

    .” She sees every single attempt at being a superhero and being “solider” for her hero figuratively and, sadly, literally blow-up in her face. This was Spider-Man levels of bad luck happening to her and she is left trying to put out a forest fire with only a bucket of water, speaking figuratively. This volume does not end with a resolution, but a promise of some light at the end of the tunnel. But we are left to wonder if even the light can be trusted at this point. All Kamala can do is fight on.

    The dual storyline that recounts Kamala’s family history was a big plus for me because it puts her history and the CWII event taking place in this volume in perspective; It begins and ends with the Khan family in South Asia. This book comes close to being a polemic against the Civil War II event and I am not complaining about it. This makes very excited to see the new status quo going forward in this series.

  • Helia
    Nov 24, 2016

    This volume was so enjoyable to read, and definitely my favourite so far. And I had so many doubts! The whole concept behind universe resets really frustrates me (I’m not an big comic reader, sue me), so I’ve been expecting the 2016 issues to fall short for me. But what I love about this series is that I don’t feel obliged to read the other series in order to understand what is going on.

    I normally find that I read these comics for Kamala as a character because she’s really interesting to me, but

    This volume was so enjoyable to read, and definitely my favourite so far. And I had so many doubts! The whole concept behind universe resets really frustrates me (I’m not an big comic reader, sue me), so I’ve been expecting the 2016 issues to fall short for me. But what I love about this series is that I don’t feel obliged to read the other series in order to understand what is going on.

    I normally find that I read these comics for Kamala as a character because she’s really interesting to me, but this time she was backed by a super strong storyline.

    What I loved about this volume is that Kamala actually questions her own morality and adapts it. She isn’t following a premeditated code. This is her seeing that things are more complicated than right and wrong. Why are the villains doing what they do? Maybe they need help. Or maybe they’re not in the wrong at all. Kamala’s questioning of what and who she believes in shows that she’s flawed but growing, which I find far more interesting than the typical hero with a strict moral/immoral code that I’m used to seeing.

    There are quite a few flashbacks in this volume which were an unexpected surprise, but something I think was needed for the story. I liked to see how Kamala’s past and present all connected in a way that didn’t feel forced. Plus with her visiting her family in Pakistan it definitely felt like everything came full circle.

    There are a lot of ideas in Volume 6 that really grabbed me: the fight to have a good education, the morality of “predictive justice”, and being too Pakistani for Americans yet too American for Pakistanis whilst finding a home in both places (something that I can kind of relate to). These are all ideas that tell me I’m absolutely going to be picking up the next volume.

    I’ll leave you with some great quotes under the squiggles!

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    “we shouldn’t have to battle to the death just to get into good colleges and not end up a trillion dollars in debt afterward.”

    “You never know what people have been through. Sometimes people are not at their best. Sometimes families get separated. You should know that better than most.”

    “A life is a life. You don’t get to decide which ones are collateral damage.”

    “If everybody leaves, who’s left to fix things?”

  • Sam Quixote
    Jan 18, 2017

    A couple books ago Ms Marvel was engulfed in the then-current Marvel event, Secret Wars, and thankfully came through relatively unscathed; this time around Kamala is once more sucked into the latest event, Civil War II, and it kinda ruins this one unfortunately. Not to say it’s a bad comic but it’s definitely my least favourite volume in the series so far. Good job, Marvel!

    I haven’t read Civil War II yet but from what I can tell from this book the premise is that an Inhuman telepath called Ulys

    A couple books ago Ms Marvel was engulfed in the then-current Marvel event, Secret Wars, and thankfully came through relatively unscathed; this time around Kamala is once more sucked into the latest event, Civil War II, and it kinda ruins this one unfortunately. Not to say it’s a bad comic but it’s definitely my least favourite volume in the series so far. Good job, Marvel!

    I haven’t read Civil War II yet but from what I can tell from this book the premise is that an Inhuman telepath called Ulysses can see the future and predict when crimes will be committed. Carol Danvers/Captain Marvel decides to use Ulysses to set up a kind of “future crimes division”, arresting people who haven’t committed crimes yet but apparently will, while Iron Man opposes her – the rest of the Marvel heroes fracture along these two figures and we have Civil War II. Minority Report anyone (which is actually referenced here)?

    Carol asks Kamala to head up a squad of lil’ fascists in Jersey City which, to Kamala’s credit, leads to her eventually seeing past her Captain Marvel fangirl worship and realising what’s happening is wrong. It’s not the best story particularly as Civil War II, like the first Civil War, is so blatantly one-sided you couldn’t possibly choose one over the other. Arresting people for crimes they haven’t committed? Not to mention the flaws in relying on Ulysses to always get it right and will likely get it wrong sometimes, leading to arresting innocents who don’t follow through with any crimes and remain innocent!

    You either choose to live in a free society and accept that with that freedom comes bad people who will do bad things and sometimes good people will suffer those choices, or you go totalitarian, ie. PATRIOT Act madness and beyond where you sacrifice freedom for the illusion of increased security even though bad things inevitably continue to happen. This always – ALWAYS – leads to the people given this power over you to abuse that power. Civil War II looks like such a predictable and dim-witted story.

    Anyway, yeah, this book is mostly a Marvel-ized Minority Report rip-off which I expect the main event will also be but on a grander scale. Spoilers don’t bother me but if they do to you and you don’t want to know any of the twists and turns of the main story, you might want to avoid this book until after you’ve read Civil War II as a major character death from that story is casually revealed here.

    Dotted throughout are flashbacks of Kamala’s family history going back to Pakistan’s separation from India in the wake of Indian independence from British rule. Drawn by Adrian Alphona, I loved these brief sections, telling a real, compelling human story amidst the intrusively loud superhero nonsense. That’s why I liked the last issue the most as Kamala visits her family in Karachi and we get to see Pakistani culture – it’s perspectives like these that’s made Ms Marvel such a unique Marvel title and I wish there’d been more of Kamala in Pakistan.

    There’s an issue where Kamala’s school takes on Miles Morales’ school at a science fair that was ok but mostly for Alphona’s art – the story itself is pretty unremarkable. Also, there are a couple of good things to come out of the Civil War II storyline: Takeshi Miyazawa’s art (he also drew most of the art from Ms Marvel Volume 3) and the developments in Kamala’s friendship with Bruno.

    It’s not really G. Willow Wilson’s fault – she, like everyone else, had to acknowledge and work Marvel’s latest tripe into her series whether she wanted to or not. She still manages to pack in enough of the great character moments Ms Marvel fans read her comics for, and the art team is top-notch throughout, but I still wasn’t as into this volume as I usually am when it comes to Kamala Khan, and that’s solely down to idiotic event bullshit. Hopefully the series gets back on track with the next volume.

  • Rory Wilding
    Jan 21, 2017

    When it comes to event comics, there is always the possibility that your favourite superhero will be involved and thus his or her starring title will have to evoke said event. Marvel in particular has this problem, such as Mark Millar and Steve McNiven’s

    , which interfered with great titles during that period, including Brian Michael Bendis’

    . However, that same Brian Michael Bendis also penned last year’s crossover event

    , which once again causes repercussions f

    When it comes to event comics, there is always the possibility that your favourite superhero will be involved and thus his or her starring title will have to evoke said event. Marvel in particular has this problem, such as Mark Millar and Steve McNiven’s

    , which interfered with great titles during that period, including Brian Michael Bendis’

    . However, that same Brian Michael Bendis also penned last year’s crossover event

    , which once again causes repercussions for beloved characters including Jersey City’s very own Ms. Marvel.

    As things are finally selling down for Kamala Khan, who is able to balance her life between high school and super-heroics, she is approached by her idol Carol Danvers aka Captain Marvel to supervise a young team that specialises in capturing people who are about to commit crimes, based on the precognitions from the Inhuman Ulysses Cain. Despite her initial enthusiasm, Kamala learns that predictive justice is doing no good as tragedy strikes too close to home.

    Last time

    took part in a crossover event was 2015’s

    as displayed in Volume 4 which was a flawless conclusion for the title before the “Marvel NOW!” relaunch as despite the apocalyptic event, G. Willow Wilson was able to keep Kamala’s story intimate, making it almost a tearjerker. In the case of this volume, simply titled

    , I can’t give that same amount of praise as before that event does really affect Kamala’s adventure and not necessarily for the right reasons. For starters, the central narrative involves an Inhuman who can predict crimes not yet committed, is clearly ripped off from

    , that even a Canadian ninja refers to “that one movie with that short actor”. That’s right, this features Canadian ninjas.

    Despite the superhero nonsense from the likes of Captain Marvel, the heart of

    is not about saving the world or even Jersey City, but the advantages and disadvantages of a teenager playing superhero, and how it affects her personal life. The best moments of the

    arc – aside from the always great manga-ish artwork by Takeshi Miyazawa – are the first pages of each issue, showing Kamala’s family history, starting with the Indo-Pakistani War of 1947 to present day, and how one golden bracelet is passed to the next generation, all of which nicely illustrated by series regular Adrian Alphona.

    However, what stands out in this volume is issues #7 and #12. The former (drawn by Alphona) centres on a scientific school-off between New Jersey and New York, with Kamala Khan and Miles Morales aka Spider-Man competing against each other, despite being members of the All-New, All-Different Avengers. This silly battle of brains and wits is, I imagine, more enjoyable than the main

    storyline and a lesson is learned during this squabble about these kids from other schools shouldn’t fight for the purpose of whose better.

    Concluding the sixth volume with #12, in which following the personal turmoil of Jersey City, Kamala flies to Karachi in Pakistan, where she not only reconnects with her family, but finds her true place in the world. Illustrated by Mirka Andolfo, you do miss the sensibilities of Alphona and Miyazawa, but Wilson’s writing is so personal and touching that despite being thrown into the Marvel eventful baggage, Kamala Khan will always come out strong and by the end of the book, she knows her place and hopefully Volume 7 will be a step-up.

  • David Schaafsma
    Jan 30, 2017

    Well, well, well. Sometimes my reading of comics coincides with what is going on in the Real World. This past weekend, Trump unleashed Chaos on the world by his (one of several, more to come, I’ll bet) insanely anti-Muslim, anti-immigration move. And I joined protests, but I also just happened to pick up and read this comic about a Pakistani Muslim immigrant girl from Jersey City who has her own ideas about Making the World Great again, since she actually woke up one morning as an incarnation of

    Well, well, well. Sometimes my reading of comics coincides with what is going on in the Real World. This past weekend, Trump unleashed Chaos on the world by his (one of several, more to come, I’ll bet) insanely anti-Muslim, anti-immigration move. And I joined protests, but I also just happened to pick up and read this comic about a Pakistani Muslim immigrant girl from Jersey City who has her own ideas about Making the World Great again, since she actually woke up one morning as an incarnation of Ms. Marvel.

    And, in the wake of Trump’s crude recent attempts to block scientific advancement (the attempts at silencing of the EPA, National Parks, and so on) with a focus on the denial of climate change, she is on her team’s tri-state Science Academic Competition team, inventing solutions to (among other things) climate change!! Spiderman and Nova are on one of the other teams, so that’s cute. This stuff is much more interesting than the required tie-in Wilson is required to make to the Marvel Civil War II event, which I am thankfully pretty oblivious about.

    But there is something here that also connects to current weekend events Kamala has to work through: When faced with ISIS or any global threats, do you double down on the fascist/totalitarian approach and give up all your freedoms for the fantasy of “secure borders”? This is the question the USA and other newly right-leaning countries is in the process of answering, and it appears like they are making the wrong decisions, as Wilson seems to demonstrate here.

    I loved the flashbacks to the Kamala family’s life in the forties in Pakistan during the time of separation from India and British colonial rule. In the end Kamala visits her family in Karachi and we get to understand and appreciate Pakistani Muslim culture, imagine that. These sections are so much more interesting than anything superhero-related in this volume. I very much recommend Ms Marvel, ala Willow Wilson. If they can just get away from this Civil War stuff. You get to like her devout and interesting family, and appreciate her struggles with faith and superhero-dom.

    I love the drawing of Adrian Alphona, too, the dominant artist in this series, and like his replacements in this volume much less. It’s kind of a mixed bag, this particular issue, maybe 3 stars, overall, maybe 3.5, but I round up because of it’s resistance to Trump! 🙂

  • Obsidian
    Mar 11, 2017

    This volume was fantastic. I didn’t realize the superheroes were splintered. In this volume we have Kamala working for Carol Danvers and trying to train up Carol’s so called Cadets. Carol believes that she can stop crime from happening by using a system in which they can tell if people are going to commit a crime a beforehand. So pretty much everybody just think of the Tom Cruise movie Minority Report. And if you have seen that movie you know this isn’t going to work and this is totally flawed.

    W

    This volume was fantastic. I didn’t realize the superheroes were splintered. In this volume we have Kamala working for Carol Danvers and trying to train up Carol’s so called Cadets. Carol believes that she can stop crime from happening by using a system in which they can tell if people are going to commit a crime a beforehand. So pretty much everybody just think of the Tom Cruise movie Minority Report. And if you have seen that movie you know this isn’t going to work and this is totally flawed.

    What really works is that we see Kamala start to be more vocal about not agreeing with Carol, even though she’s her idol. Carol is hell-bent on protecting the city from crimes and doesn’t seem to really care about the fact that other people could be hurt. When Kamala’s friend Bruno is hurt due to actions by the cadets Kamala switches sides and decides she’ll do whatever she can to bring down the cadets, even if it means taking down Carol.

    In between all that the volume switches back and forth between Kamala’s parents in Karach,i Pakistan and even shows Kamala going to Pakistan.

    When Kamala and Bruno have a falling-out, Kamala is left twisting in the wind a little bit and trying to figure out where she belongs.

    I did get a kick out of seeing this Ms. Marvel in traditional Pakistani garb. And I definitely loved her meeting another local superhero who maybe possibly could be a future love interest. I definitely liked the guy.

    I think all in all though this volume was definitely about Kamala growing up and realizing that even though she admires and cares for Carol Danvers sometimes the hardest thing you can do with people that you admire and love is stand up to them. And then we have Tony Stark showing up by the way who totally kicks ass again in this volume by just being there for Kamala. I like to imagine him being a leader for all the younger superheroes because he’s definitely had some hard lessons.

    I obviously love the artwork and the panels are really good and your heart breaks a little bit when you get this see how much Bruno means to Kamala. I was surprised to not see Mike though and I don’t see how they work with Bruno going to Wakandà.

    The volume leaves Kamala on the outs with Carol. Though Carol does get rid of Basic Becky and her nasty self. Can’t wait til the next volume.