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Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less

Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less

One of Silicon Valley’s sharpest strategists shows that success doesn’t demand longer, harder hours, it demands that you work lessFor most of us, overwork is the new normal and rest is an afterthought. In our busy lives, rest is defined as the absence of work: late-night TV binges, hours spent trawling the internet, something to do once we’ve finished everything else on ou…

Title : Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less
Author : Alex Soojung-Kim Pang
Rating :
ISBN : 0465074871
Edition Language : English
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 320 pages

Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less Reviews

  • Ruthmarie
    Jan 07, 2017

    Malcolm Gladwell-esque: focus on a topic that is rather narrow, though not unimportant, using historical and contemporary persons as examples. Because it is written for the general (but well-educated) reader, it seems to me that the author strains to expand the work into book length. Nevertheless, I read the work at an appropriate time–immediately following the Christmas and New Year’s holidays.

  • David
    Jan 12, 2017

    I want to give this book 10 stars, because our culture needs this message so much. I saw this author keynote at a conference a few years back (wish I could remember which one), his talk at that time was about another of his books, but what I remember is how impressed I was by his presentation and his ideas. So when I saw this book among the new titles at the Mechanics Institute, I had to check it out. Now I will return the library copy and buy one to keep. The message seemed so obvious, I was a

    I want to give this book 10 stars, because our culture needs this message so much. I saw this author keynote at a conference a few years back (wish I could remember which one), his talk at that time was about another of his books, but what I remember is how impressed I was by his presentation and his ideas. So when I saw this book among the new titles at the Mechanics Institute, I had to check it out. Now I will return the library copy and buy one to keep. The message seemed so obvious, I was a little hesitant at first, but a quick dip at random convinced me to read it, and I am so glad I did. I’ve been trying to change my workaholic ways, and this book persuades me that not only is that good for me, but it will also be good for my work. Rest of the kinds described here (including the dreaded exercise) is likely to make me more effective and creative when I do work, so that I am more useful to my employer than if I merely slog away for longer and longer hours. I have certainly spent years trying the longer and longer hours approach, so I know for sure that’s not sustainable. It is good to know that research backs me up on this — and lots of great stories, which you will enjoy reading, if you follow my suggestion of getting ahold of this book at the earliest available opportunity.

  • Shay
    Jan 26, 2017

    Pang cites a variety of scientific studies from around the world, on subjects such as sleeping, napping, exercise, and creativity in order to show how these activities—which occur outside of work—come together to profoundly influence productivity and creative thinking on the job. He also looks into the lives of figures like Charles Darwin, Winston Churchill, and Dwight Eisenhower, to show how they incorporated restful practices into their daily routines while also producing great work, or operat

    Pang cites a variety of scientific studies from around the world, on subjects such as sleeping, napping, exercise, and creativity in order to show how these activities—which occur outside of work—come together to profoundly influence productivity and creative thinking on the job. He also looks into the lives of figures like Charles Darwin, Winston Churchill, and Dwight Eisenhower, to show how they incorporated restful practices into their daily routines while also producing great work, or operating under extremely stressful circumstances.Pang’s contention is not unique, and he isn’t the first person to call out the destructive nature of our sleep-deprived, always-on business culture. However, I did like the way he approached rest holistically. Sleep is an important part of the book, but Pang also examines routines, exercise, and hobbies, as well as vacations and sabbaticals to see how these others forms of taking a break from work affect our performance.

  • Sandi
    Jan 28, 2017

    This is written on premise that people need to rest to become better workers. A good idea for everyone.,this book gives ideas that might valuable such walking deep playing,napping etc. good idea for caregivers too

  • Karen Ashmore
    Jan 29, 2017

    We should all work less and rest more. Not only will you be more at peace but you will also be more productive and creative. Here’s how: work four hours at a time, develop a morning routine, take walks, take cat naps, stop when you are going good so you know exactly where to dive in when you restart work, get plenty of sleep, take vacations, exercise everyday, participate in deep play (sport, hobby, musical instrument, etc), take a sabbatical every few years. And then you will have a restful lif

    We should all work less and rest more. Not only will you be more at peace but you will also be more productive and creative. Here’s how: work four hours at a time, develop a morning routine, take walks, take cat naps, stop when you are going good so you know exactly where to dive in when you restart work, get plenty of sleep, take vacations, exercise everyday, participate in deep play (sport, hobby, musical instrument, etc), take a sabbatical every few years. And then you will have a restful life. Author did not mention but I would add eat healthy and meditate or pray.

  • Luca Conti
    Feb 16, 2017

    Seppur non abbia imparato molto di più di ciò che non sapessi già, è bene confrontarsi con altri punti di vista e soprattutto fonti differenziate su un tema che mi sta a cuore: vivere consapevolmente, in equilibrio.

    Ogni capitolo del libro di Alex Soojung-Kim Pang è dedicato a un’azione legata al riposo: routine del mattino, dormire, camminare, fare un sonnellino, fermarsi, giocare, fare esercizio fisico e altro. Ogni capitolo cita personaggi noti del passato – Charles Darwin è quello che mi è ri

    Seppur non abbia imparato molto di più di ciò che non sapessi già, è bene confrontarsi con altri punti di vista e soprattutto fonti differenziate su un tema che mi sta a cuore: vivere consapevolmente, in equilibrio.

    Ogni capitolo del libro di Alex Soojung-Kim Pang è dedicato a un’azione legata al riposo: routine del mattino, dormire, camminare, fare un sonnellino, fermarsi, giocare, fare esercizio fisico e altro. Ogni capitolo cita personaggi noti del passato – Charles Darwin è quello che mi è rimasto più impresso – quali esempi di come queste pratiche contribuiscano al benessere psico-fisico, con un vantaggio anche sul piano del lavoro e della produttività. Darwin lavorava circa 4 ore al giorno, divise tra mattina e pomeriggio, intervallando lunghe passeggiate, un buon pranzo e un sonnellino..

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  • Wendi
    Feb 19, 2017

    The author says rest is just as important as work because quality rest makes work time more energetic, creative, efficient, and inspired. Rest can mean taking a walk, taking a nap, going on vacation, indulging in a hobby. He has such good examples and writes so clearly, the book’s purpose is fulfilled 3/4 of the way through. “Rest ” can be read quickly.

    Not 5 stars because the book was longer than necessary. And it is not long, less than 300 pages. Alex Soojung-Kim Pang is just too efficient. Ma

    The author says rest is just as important as work because quality rest makes work time more energetic, creative, efficient, and inspired. Rest can mean taking a walk, taking a nap, going on vacation, indulging in a hobby. He has such good examples and writes so clearly, the book’s purpose is fulfilled 3/4 of the way through. “Rest ” can be read quickly.

    Not 5 stars because the book was longer than necessary. And it is not long, less than 300 pages. Alex Soojung-Kim Pang is just too efficient. Maybe he wrote it while well-rested but then was told by the publisher that it needed to be longer.

  • Marrije
    Mar 10, 2017

    I’m a bit conflicted about this book. It starts out by saying ‘don’t work all the time – rest is important, too’. But by the end it’s mostly a manifesto to not so much *rest* as do hard and challenging stuff (climb mountains, play the violin) *in addition to* working quite a lot.

    The most successful scientists, for instance, have very intensive hobbies, while less successful scientists don’t.

    Which makes me wonder: is that perhaps because the successful people have more energy in the first place?

    I’m a bit conflicted about this book. It starts out by saying ‘don’t work all the time – rest is important, too’. But by the end it’s mostly a manifesto to not so much *rest* as do hard and challenging stuff (climb mountains, play the violin) *in addition to* working quite a lot.

    The most successful scientists, for instance, have very intensive hobbies, while less successful scientists don’t.

    Which makes me wonder: is that perhaps because the successful people have more energy in the first place? Are we shaming people with a little less fuel in the tank for to pursue those intensive side projects, telling them ‘if only you did EVEN MORE, you’d be more of a success’? Or would the energy to become more successful *follow* if you pursued sports and music? Can’t quite figure it out.

  • Michael
    Mar 05, 2017

    Terrific book from a fellow Penn grad on the topic of rest. I found it fascinating. The author makes the case that rest and leisure are not secondary activities to work, but essential partners with work to live a creative, meaningful life. It’s chock full of interesting anecdotes and tidbits of historical info.

    Some quick takeaways:

    -rest is a partner with work

    -the best restorative kinds of rest are active

    -rest results in a more creative life

    -night owls who make it a habit to work in the morning o

    Terrific book from a fellow Penn grad on the topic of rest. I found it fascinating. The author makes the case that rest and leisure are not secondary activities to work, but essential partners with work to live a creative, meaningful life. It’s chock full of interesting anecdotes and tidbits of historical info.

    Some quick takeaways:

    -rest is a partner with work

    -the best restorative kinds of rest are active

    -rest results in a more creative life

    -night owls who make it a habit to work in the morning often display greater creativity

    -top leaders often take naps

    -better to take more frequent shorter vacations than a long vacation

  • Joanne
    Mar 08, 2017

    The premise of the book is the title. The rest is just detail: summary of research from neuroscience, health, etc.

    Surprisingly, for a book about rest, the author overlooks the age-old concept of Sabbath.