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Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less

Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less

For most of us, overwork is the new normal and rest is an afterthought. In our busy lives, rest is defined as the absence of work: late-night TV binges, hours spent trawling the internet, something to do once we’ve finished everything else on our to-do lists. But dismissing rest stifles our ability to think creatively and truly recharge.In Rest, Silicon Valley consultant A…

Title : Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less
Author : Alex Soojung-Kim Pang
Rating :
ISBN : 0465074871
Edition Language : English
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 320 pages

Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less Reviews

  • Ietrio
    Dec 28, 2016

    You do more if you work less. This is a homeopathic book. Once you won’t do a thing your results will reach the infinity. And that is certainly the case as the people who do nothing are next to perfection.

    Sarcasm aside, this is a poorly written book about how to work more. Yea, besides the title, nothing is about working less. It is about working more. Which makes much more sense than the catchy and misleading title. Only this time you don’t just go to work. You start working at dawn, do some ph

    You do more if you work less. This is a homeopathic book. Once you won’t do a thing your results will reach the infinity. And that is certainly the case as the people who do nothing are next to perfection.

    Sarcasm aside, this is a poorly written book about how to work more. Yea, besides the title, nothing is about working less. It is about working more. Which makes much more sense than the catchy and misleading title. Only this time you don’t just go to work. You start working at dawn, do some physical activity, and so on. You work more for the same pay. And at the end of the day you should be glad that you did so much for your employer. Atta boy / girl! Go to bed early because tomorrow is another working day.

  • Diana Olivares
    Jan 16, 2017

    An interesting approach to finding balance between work and rest and learning to view them as equals. The author includes many examples of persons who seem to have shaped his conclusions about how to achieve creativity and productivity. It seemed ironic to me that his sports figures examples seemed to be from almost a century ago, but the scientist examples could be found throughout. I found this perspective on rest enlightening.

  • Ruthmarie
    Jan 07, 2017

    Malcolm Gladwell-esque: focus on a topic that is rather narrow, though not unimportant, using historical and contemporary persons as examples. Because it is written for the general (but well-educated) reader, it seems to me that the author strains to expand the work into book length. Nevertheless, I read the work at an appropriate time–immediately following the Christmas and New Year’s holidays.

  • David
    Jan 12, 2017

    I want to give this book 10 stars, because our culture needs this message so much. I saw this author keynote at a conference a few years back (wish I could remember which one), his talk at that time was about another of his books, but what I remember is how impressed I was by his presentation and his ideas. So when I saw this book among the new titles at the Mechanics Institute, I had to check it out. Now I will return the library copy and buy one to keep. The message seemed so obvious, I was a

    I want to give this book 10 stars, because our culture needs this message so much. I saw this author keynote at a conference a few years back (wish I could remember which one), his talk at that time was about another of his books, but what I remember is how impressed I was by his presentation and his ideas. So when I saw this book among the new titles at the Mechanics Institute, I had to check it out. Now I will return the library copy and buy one to keep. The message seemed so obvious, I was a little hesitant at first, but a quick dip at random convinced me to read it, and I am so glad I did. I’ve been trying to change my workaholic ways, and this book persuades me that not only is that good for me, but it will also be good for my work. Rest of the kinds described here (including the dreaded exercise) is likely to make me more effective and creative when I do work, so that I am more useful to my employer than if I merely slog away for longer and longer hours. I have certainly spent years trying the longer and longer hours approach, so I know for sure that’s not sustainable. It is good to know that research backs me up on this — and lots of great stories, which you will enjoy reading, if you follow my suggestion of getting ahold of this book at the earliest available opportunity.

  • Katy Smith
    Jan 14, 2017

    Just what this frazzled gal needed on a cold, winter day in January when all I want to do is rest.

  • Shay
    Jan 26, 2017

    Pang cites a variety of scientific studies from around the world, on subjects such as sleeping, napping, exercise, and creativity in order to show how these activities—which occur outside of work—come together to profoundly influence productivity and creative thinking on the job. He also looks into the lives of figures like Charles Darwin, Winston Churchill, and Dwight Eisenhower, to show how they incorporated restful practices into their daily routines while also producing great work, or operat

    Pang cites a variety of scientific studies from around the world, on subjects such as sleeping, napping, exercise, and creativity in order to show how these activities—which occur outside of work—come together to profoundly influence productivity and creative thinking on the job. He also looks into the lives of figures like Charles Darwin, Winston Churchill, and Dwight Eisenhower, to show how they incorporated restful practices into their daily routines while also producing great work, or operating under extremely stressful circumstances.Pang’s contention is not unique, and he isn’t the first person to call out the destructive nature of our sleep-deprived, always-on business culture. However, I did like the way he approached rest holistically. Sleep is an important part of the book, but Pang also examines routines, exercise, and hobbies, as well as vacations and sabbaticals to see how these others forms of taking a break from work affect our performance.

  • Sandi
    Jan 28, 2017

    This is written on premise that people need to rest to become better workers. A good idea for everyone.,this book gives ideas that might valuable such walking deep playing,napping etc. good idea for caregivers too

  • Dee
    Jan 30, 2017

    3.5 stars– lots of research and a few ideas for practical application.

  • Karen Ashmore
    Jan 29, 2017

    We should all work less and rest more. Not only will you be more at peace but you will also be more productive and creative. Here’s how: work four hours at a time, develop a morning routine, take walks, take cat naps, stop when you are going good so you know exactly where to dive in when you restart work, get plenty of sleep, take vacations, exercise everyday, participate in deep play (sport, hobby, musical instrument, etc), take a sabbatical every few years. And then you will have a restful lif

    We should all work less and rest more. Not only will you be more at peace but you will also be more productive and creative. Here’s how: work four hours at a time, develop a morning routine, take walks, take cat naps, stop when you are going good so you know exactly where to dive in when you restart work, get plenty of sleep, take vacations, exercise everyday, participate in deep play (sport, hobby, musical instrument, etc), take a sabbatical every few years. And then you will have a restful life. Author did not mention but I would add eat healthy and meditate or pray.

  • Kimy
    Feb 06, 2017

    I received this book from a Goodreads Giveaway. The author makes some good points and I wish we could all rest more. I hope to put some of the points into practice.