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18 and Life on Skid Row

18 and Life on Skid Row

In this uncensored, unfiltered memoir, the musician and former front man for Skid Row tells the story of how a choir boy became a mega-successful hair metal god, rode the wave of fame in Heavy Metal’s heyday, and came out alive on the other side when glam rock went the way of the cassette tape and the Walkman.Sebastian Bach is an iconic rock vocalist who has sold in excess…

Title : 18 and Life on Skid Row
Author : Sebastian Bach
Rating :
ISBN : 0062265393
Edition Language : English
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 448 pages

18 and Life on Skid Row Reviews

  • Robin
    Jul 12, 2016

    Head-bangers and “party on doooood!” fans will love this memoir of heavy metal band, Skid Row. It’s also interesting for readers who can’t resist a good tell-all memoir that totally embraces the “sex, drugs, and rock and roll” lifestyle.

    This was told in a conversational and candid style, occasionally breaking the fourth wall by prefacing a sentence with “Dear reader” and sometimes apologizing for his behavior and justifying why he acted a certain way, which was a little jarring. He did seem to p

    Head-bangers and “party on doooood!” fans will love this memoir of heavy metal band, Skid Row. It’s also interesting for readers who can’t resist a good tell-all memoir that totally embraces the “sex, drugs, and rock and roll” lifestyle.

    This was told in a conversational and candid style, occasionally breaking the fourth wall by prefacing a sentence with “Dear reader” and sometimes apologizing for his behavior and justifying why he acted a certain way, which was a little jarring. He did seem to piss off a lot of people, and quite frankly, his abominable actions would piss me off, too. What I found most interesting were his friendships and working relationships with bands of the 80s such as Aerosmith, Bon Jovi, Guns ‘n Roses, Motley Crue, and more, but unfortunately his drug use and occasional violent episodes caused a few riffs with various band members. Eventually he makes his way to the Broadway stage starring in Jekyll and Hyde and Jesus Christ, Superstar and included a little of the behind-the-scenes information. I’ll be looking for old videos and Broadway performances on YouTube.

    Recommended for those who are interested in the music of the 80s and especially for fans of the band.

  • Online Eccentric Librarian
    Aug 31, 2016

    18 and Life On Skid Row is not a deep book – there are no Keith Richards musings on life or rich observations on the artist as a rock star. Rather, what we have is a series of vignette remembrances told from the simple perspective of a man-child. He got drunk or stoned, he did bad things, pretty much everyone began to hate him (or, in his thoughts, were jealous of him). but really he was just a nice guy on an interesting

    18 and Life On Skid Row is not a deep book – there are no Keith Richards musings on life or rich observations on the artist as a rock star. Rather, what we have is a series of vignette remembrances told from the simple perspective of a man-child. He got drunk or stoned, he did bad things, pretty much everyone began to hate him (or, in his thoughts, were jealous of him). but really he was just a nice guy on an interesting trip. There aren’t any super highs or super lows; no moments of clarity since he never hit rock bottom/nearly died from an overdose as so many did in that era; nor dizzying heights of super stardom and the limelight. Rather, we have a story told in a very straightforward and simple way: a reflection of Bach and his fairly basic story to tell.

    The biography unfolds chronologically and moves quickly and cleanly. This is a world centered fully on Bach; every other person, including bandmates or rock star friends, are ciphers and very undeveloped. It felt like that was the superficial way in which Bach operates/operated in the world; never taking anything too seriously and going along with the flow of what everyone else was doing. Crazy sex acts with groupies and cheating on his girlfriend/wife? Expected – it’s what every rock star does, right? Doing lots of coke (“blow”) until hitting utter stupidity? Again, it’s what all the rock guys are doing. And so we never get analysis, observations, or interesting thoughts on the people with whom Bach interacted. He’s a little whirlwind of pure egocentricity (though not narcissistic, fortunately). We really are swimming in fairly shallow waters.

    So where does this get interesting? Bach interacts with 1970s acts like Kiss and Aerosmith – and they had survived 1970s partying to come out on the other side with strict sobriety edicts. Bach blissfully walks in with drugs or alcohol and is summarily told to take off. Especially poignant was a scene in which Gene Simmons of Kiss (Bach’s idol) expresses his disgust at Bach’s drug fueled antics. Similarly, behind the scenes of life with Bon Jovi, with whom his band was intimately bound, are also worth the read. Vignettes of other bands including Guns N Roses, Pantera, etc. are interspersed throughout.

    Because Bach is, admittedly, fairly oblivious, one can read between the lines that he managed to tick off nearly everyone with whom he worked/interacted. What he believed were jealousies begin to look more and more like people wanting to get away from the wrecking ball that was a drunk/stoned Bach. Either punching out relatives of band mates or doing crazy things – I don’t think he remembers most of it but I bet all the people he ticked off remember well. He is abandoned constantly yet doesn’t seem able to understand why when he’s such a nice guy (when sober).

    I was, admittedly, not a fan of Skid Row and didn’t choose this book to read specifically about Bach or the band. Rather, I was curious about the late 1980s because I lived in LA and would often go to the Rainbow/Roxy on weekends to hang out with/watch the metal bands as they tried to make it big in the years just before Skid Row made it big. There is some of that in here but we don’t get the sense of hunger or the ups and downs. It’s a pretty linear path of partying, hanging out with other rock stars, and then more partying. Like I mentioned earlier, he’s a pretty simple guy lacking depth or guile. And the book is very much in that vein as well. Reviewed from an advance reader copy provided by the publisher.

  • Ricky
    Jan 06, 2017

    This book was okay, the details were vague. This could be because Bach was under some kind of substance during the events. His details of using drugs is prevalent all over this book. A perfect example of how this book is written, it has words that creates sentences and eventually make a paragraph. This book has some information about his life but it lacks the depth as I feel that Bach does not remember. Overall a okay book there are better rock autobiography that focus on the music and life as a

    This book was okay, the details were vague. This could be because Bach was under some kind of substance during the events. His details of using drugs is prevalent all over this book. A perfect example of how this book is written, it has words that creates sentences and eventually make a paragraph. This book has some information about his life but it lacks the depth as I feel that Bach does not remember. Overall a okay book there are better rock autobiography that focus on the music and life as a rock start.

  • Diane
    Dec 11, 2016

    I’m not sure how Sebastian Bach survived this life but one thing is for sure, he was meant to. Omg the stories he tells are nothing short of what you only hear Rock and Roll are. He has lived his life recklessly and yet on his terms he made it work out every time. I’m glad I read his book. I have seen him on TV at times and found he has a great sense of humor but with the life he had I think you would have to. I was glad to see he found a woman that grounded him in a way that he seem

    I’m not sure how Sebastian Bach survived this life but one thing is for sure, he was meant to. Omg the stories he tells are nothing short of what you only hear Rock and Roll are. He has lived his life recklessly and yet on his terms he made it work out every time. I’m glad I read his book. I have seen him on TV at times and found he has a great sense of humor but with the life he had I think you would have to. I was glad to see he found a woman that grounded him in a way that he seems to have found some peace In that ADHD life of his. I think he does deserve it and hope he keeps landing on his feet.

  • ColinJ
    Dec 11, 2016

    It’s a fun read. Both the best and worst thing I can say about it is that it reads like someone telling you a bunch of really cool anecdotes. The downside is that as a result a lot of the fine detail gets left out. And as a hardcore Skid Row fan I want DETAIL.

    So he skims over so much that I would love to hear more about; like working with Bob Rock, the whole Nick Sterling drama and even his firing from Skid Row. The most he can really muster up there is basically “I dunno, dude. They just stoppe

    It’s a fun read. Both the best and worst thing I can say about it is that it reads like someone telling you a bunch of really cool anecdotes. The downside is that as a result a lot of the fine detail gets left out. And as a hardcore Skid Row fan I want DETAIL.

    So he skims over so much that I would love to hear more about; like working with Bob Rock, the whole Nick Sterling drama and even his firing from Skid Row. The most he can really muster up there is basically “I dunno, dude. They just stopped talking to me.” Although he and Snake Sabo have a blow-up about a KISS supporting gig they were offered that pretty much ends their relationship.

    There’s nothing about Dimebag’s death. With the whole ‘Supergroup’ debacle he talks about Ted Nugent dropping N-bombs on the set but nothing about Evan Seinfeld punching Bas in the head.

    It’s telling that the book opens with the famous incident of getting a bottle thrown at his head on stage. What there is no mention of is the politically and racially charged rant he was in the midst of when said bottle was thrown. So he kind of avoids taking much responsibility for stuff, apart from the odd fight he gets into.

    Still, it’s a must read for any Skid Row fan. It’s not THE DIRT, but then what is.

  • Alberto Tristan Benavides
    Dec 30, 2016

    I have an inexplicable fondness for the 80’s music scene. Bizarre, glitzy, in-your-face, sometimes vaudeville, and unabashedly unironic.

    As such, I am definitely a fan of Sebastian Bach. This book is exactly what you’d expect: a fun memoir from one of the glam metal scene’s most colorful and larger-than-life characters, replete with all the sex and drug fueled anecdotes you could want. It was sweet to read these anecdotes and awe over those cool, behind-the-scenes rockstar lives.

    However, I felt h

    I have an inexplicable fondness for the 80’s music scene. Bizarre, glitzy, in-your-face, sometimes vaudeville, and unabashedly unironic.

    As such, I am definitely a fan of Sebastian Bach. This book is exactly what you’d expect: a fun memoir from one of the glam metal scene’s most colorful and larger-than-life characters, replete with all the sex and drug fueled anecdotes you could want. It was sweet to read these anecdotes and awe over those cool, behind-the-scenes rockstar lives.

    However, I felt his autobiography was lacking depth in a lot of personal details, particularly when it came to negative or touchy subjects. Like yeah I get it’s difficult to talk about why your first wife divorced you, but are you really going to write two sentences that say nothing about why it happened or offer any kind of personal reflection? Another example is when he’s super vague about why he got kicked out of the band Skid Row during the early 90’s.

    It’s details and personal vignettes like this that separate a great autobiography or memoir from a merely okay one. I feel he really avoided going in depth or fully reflecting on many important events in his life meanwhile writing pages on pages about all the cocaine he snorted on the regular.

  • Samantha
    Dec 21, 2016

    As a fan of Skid Row and Sebastian Bach I would strongly suggest that Bach get a ghost writer or an editor next time. Or just skip it all together and continue his life as a rock star. It was painful reading 424 pages of babbled stories that surprisingly lacked a lot of detail. It’s frustrating because I know that he lived a wild and crazy life, but this book did nothing to paint the picture for the audience. Just flat boring sentences. And cringeworthy song references. Oh boy…

    Skip the book an

    As a fan of Skid Row and Sebastian Bach I would strongly suggest that Bach get a ghost writer or an editor next time. Or just skip it all together and continue his life as a rock star. It was painful reading 424 pages of babbled stories that surprisingly lacked a lot of detail. It’s frustrating because I know that he lived a wild and crazy life, but this book did nothing to paint the picture for the audience. Just flat boring sentences. And cringeworthy song references. Oh boy…

    Skip the book and watch the live performances and interviews.

  • Twerking To Beethoven
    Dec 26, 2016

    I guess it’d have been a much better book with the help of a ghostwriter. This is 100% Bazz’s work anyway. Hence the three stars. It’s genuine, alright.

  • Lance Lumley
    Dec 26, 2016

    I was always a fan of the band Skid Row (with and without Bach as the singer), and this book is a great book about the life and travels of singer Sebastian Bach. The book talks about his time before the band singing in church choir, until he decided to become a singer after discovering the band Kiss.

    The book takes him traveling the world with Skid Row, with tours with Bon Jovi, Aerosmith, and Motley Crue, along with his friendships with Kiss’s Ace Frehley and Axl Rose of Guns N Roses. The book

    I was always a fan of the band Skid Row (with and without Bach as the singer), and this book is a great book about the life and travels of singer Sebastian Bach. The book talks about his time before the band singing in church choir, until he decided to become a singer after discovering the band Kiss.

    The book takes him traveling the world with Skid Row, with tours with Bon Jovi, Aerosmith, and Motley Crue, along with his friendships with Kiss’s Ace Frehley and Axl Rose of Guns N Roses. The book is overall very good, but is not a in depth tell all. Bach admits that his partying years affected his relationships with bands and also talks about his time in acting, from his Reality Shows to his Broadway days.

    Overall this is a good book, however some things are passed over (like his views on Skid Row after he left, his solo club tours are kind of glossed over), but the book is lengthy at over 400 pages, so editing was needed. Maybe Bach will work on more books in the future, because I enjoyed this one.

  • George Kouros
    Dec 30, 2016

    3 stars for author’s authenticity and ability to write a decent and fluent story.

    However, I would have preferred the focus to be more on music he did with the band and the end of their cooperation (it seems to me like the other members of Skid Row were more like ghosts through the whole memoir) than the regular sex, drugs and r’n’r folklore and obscene language, because Bazz is talented and passionate musician (and vinyl collector). Not that I have a problem with this, actually some of the stor

    3 stars for author’s authenticity and ability to write a decent and fluent story.

    However, I would have preferred the focus to be more on music he did with the band and the end of their cooperation (it seems to me like the other members of Skid Row were more like ghosts through the whole memoir) than the regular sex, drugs and r’n’r folklore and obscene language, because Bazz is talented and passionate musician (and vinyl collector). Not that I have a problem with this, actually some of the stories presented here concerning celebrities of that era were hilarious, to say the least.